Coding

A revelation to me – and a platitude for the mighty Google – but there’s a great number of online challenges to help you master the art of coding, you know, just in case you wanted to do some serious studying over the summer. Here are some 1,500 problems to solve on Python, and here’s a similar collection for C# just to get you started. The idea here is that you set yourself a daily goal of, say, two problems, and keep at it for a week or two or maybe even a whole month. Success, or at least progress, is guaranteed! 

Credit: Kelly Sikkema on Unsplash
Credit: Kelly Sikkema on Unsplash

Staying creative

If our weekend guides have spurred your new interest for drawing or writing but you somehow found it hard to approach these alluring hobbies – or have completed the courses and need something more, why not try one of the many daily challenges out there? A poem a day, watercolor paintings and sketching, journaling, taking pictures, or even last year’s Inktober? Nothing’s impossible with the mantra “a little bit every day”. As an added bonus, you can set a time limit – say, draw or write for only 15 minutes, and see where they take your creative spirit. 

Credit: kike vega on Unsplash
Credit: kike vega on Unsplash

Exercise 

This option is possibly the most straightforward one, as summer is probably the best time to work on your well-being. And the diversity of activities you can look into is stunning – stretching, yoga, pilates, dancing, running, the limit here being only your imagination. Again, the approach you take is key here, so the most important thing is having fun and doing it consistently, and not pushing yourself to the limit – unless, of course, that is what you want to do.

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